Select location to see news around that location.Select Location

It is not the environment that needs saving, but humans

It is not the environment that needs saving, but humans

India has always displayed a keen desire to play a constructive role in combating the threat of climate change and has taken conscious decisions to fight greenhouse gas emissions, particularly by focusing on renewable energy.

Chase India on the 4th of July 2018, organized 'The Earth Dialogues', a panel discussion on environmental degradation and ways to resolve it, along with the challenges faced by the country.The theme of the discussion was centred to the policy, implementation and economic aspects of greenhouse gas emission reduction strategies. The chief-of-honour was Mr. C K Mishra, Secretary, Ministry Of Environment, Forest and Climate Change. The other panelist were Mr. Nitin Desai, distinguished fellow, TERI, Mr. Sudhir Mishra, founder and managing partner, Trust Legal and Mr. Subir Gupta, founding partner, Sustainability Advisors.

'The Earth Dialogues' brought together people of the civil society and other policy makers to discuss various aspects of sustainable environment. The theme of the discussion was centered around the policy, implementation and economic aspects of greenhouse gas emission reduction strategies. The chief-of-honour was Mr. C K Mishra, Secretary, Ministry Of Environment, Forest and Climate Change.

The other panelist were Mr. Nitin Desai, distinguished fellow, TERI, Mr. Sudhir Mishra, founder and managing partner, Trust Legal and Mr. Subir Gupta, founding partner, Sustainability Advisors. In the recent years, countries around the world have been moving towards operational sustainable technologies. In order to achieve the mark, every country has been working in a different way. But the question that stands is what does India need to tackle the problems revolving around environmental rights and security.

Mishra said, "Global agreements do not necessarily lead to national improvements at the end of the day. It is a country driven program designed to help us." India is not at the stage where electricity can be provided to 300 million people, abolishing the use of fossil fuels at the same time. Although a slow process, India is sure to achieve the target soon. We are one of the fastest growing economies thus it is necessary for us to fulfil our domestic priorities.

Although the fundamental elements of the Paris agreement are common for all nations, it has differentiated responsibilities, meaning it is all on the nationally determined contributions i.e capability and capacity of the countries which will differ them from developed and developing countries. The two critical elements according to the Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INCD) are technology and finance.

The developed countries in the Paris agreement, when addressing to China and India had said that the countries must 'raise their ambitions'. It is too much and too soon for them to use the resources. Speaking at the forum Mr. Sudhir Mishra said its not always the responsibility of the government to manage things, individuals need to take action for themselves. Government can only make and implement policies but an individual needs to decide whether he'll follow them or not. "The resources must be used efficiently and effectively. It is very sad that seven Indian cities top the list of the most polluted cities in the world.

An individual must adapt pro sustainability" he added. The panel finally ended the discussion with ways to curb the rapid increase of air pollution in Delhi. To this MR. CK Mishra commented that Delhi is not the only city which needs to take measures the same also goes for the areas of the National Capital Region (NCR). The governments of Haryana and Uttar Pradesh, who share their borders with Delhi, should make efforts to stop the pollution. Together it is going to be easier to overcome pollution.



Anwesha Ghosh

Anwesha Ghosh

Our Contributor help bring you the latest article around you


Share it
Top
To Top