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Rolls-Royce unveils 'the most silent car ever'

Rolls-Royce unveils

The all new 'Phantom' by Rolls-Royce Motor Cars was unveiled on 27th July 2017. From the moment Sir Henry Royce introduced the Rolls-Royce Phantom in 1925 it was judged 'The Best Car in the World' by the cognoscenti.


The new luxury car is a creation of great beauty and power. It is a dominant symbol of wealth and human achievement. It is an icon and an artwork that is built to embrace the personal desires of it's customers.

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What is the Architecture of Luxury?


The Rolls-Royce engineers have built an Architecture of Luxury which is an all-aluminium space frame architecture designed to underpin every future Rolls-Royce beginning with the New Phantom.

The car has been designed and engineered from the ground up in such a way so as to be scalable to the size and weight requirements of different future Rolls-Royce models, including those with different propulsion, traction and control systems, thus underpinning the long-term future product roadmap.

Immense effort was also put in to create 'the most silent motor car in the world' which included 6mm two-layer glazing all around the car, more than 130kg of sound insulation, the largest ever cast aluminium joints in a body-in-white for better sound insulation, and use of high absorption materials.

With the focus on creating the most silent motor car in the world, a completely silent engine was also required. Hence a completely new, 6.75-litre V12 powertrain has been engineered for New Phantom, in place of the previous naturally aspirated V12 engine.

Whilst the majority of so-called luxury manufacturers are limited to sharing individual platforms in a specific sector with mass brands for saying their SUV or GT offerings, thereby introducing unacceptable compromise, Rolls-Royce is uncompromising and only uses its own architecture across all its motor cars, whatever the sector.


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